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Month: June 2018

Wump VR – Vladmir Storm & alpha_rats

Wump VR – Vladmir Storm & alpha_rats

Wump VR


 

What is the human experience? Is it defined by our everyday interactions with one another and our external environment? Or is it characterized by our seemingly unique abilities to empathize? Our ‘free will’?

Virtual reality, along with every other (insert adjective here)-reality tech, has given compelling responses to these questions, further blurring the line of what differentiates the human experience to everything else.

A curious project that is still in development, Wump VR is what most would describe as a psychedelic trip that peaked a bit more than it should. Mesmerizing visuals and musical interactions bombard your senses as users try to figure out how to navigate through this vivid Cronenberg version of the human experience.

‘A VR experience about life states. It’s based on alien organic aesthetics and VR physical interactions. You will experience the journey of life. Leaving sag mom womb, being a liquid baby, tripping teenager, busy parent and dry old person. Genderless, wump will call back and after the unbirth circle of life will never end.’

Wump VR simplifies and transforms the human experience into what might as well be an alien dream. Each life state is defined by the visual aesthetics and interactions the user encounters as they progress through the experience. The user’s body changes and morphs through each stage, granting new modes of interaction with the environment. 

“We wanted to keep the journey as universal as possible, focusing on the evolution of the body rather than lifestyles, life experiences, gender, etc.”

There are many virtual reality developers and creators with their own unique aesthetic stories to tell. Soon, we’ll be living in a future where we can choose any experience we want to live, temporarily or even permanently. I believe the human experience is not inherently human but rather an extension of the fluidity of existence. Are we all living a vivid virtual dream, wandering around as we all soak in the abstract information of our environment? Do we even want to take off the goggles? That’s for the individual to decide.

Vladimir Storm and alpha_rats are incredible VR designers. More of their beautiful work can be found on their Behance.

~ Emanuel Iral, Director of Visual Art, U.S. Transhumanist Party, June 30, 2018 

The Case for Reversing Aging – Article by Arin Vahanian

The Case for Reversing Aging – Article by Arin Vahanian

Arin Vahanian


As incredulous as it may seem, I have had numerous people ask me why I support research and funding for reversing the aging process.

The usual arguments against stopping or slowing aging are that there is some sort of natural process or natural order of things, and that human beings shouldn’t be “playing God.”

In this short article, I would like to present my personal views on aging and why I believe it is perfectly natural, and in fact, desirable, for human beings to want to overcome this limitation, or at least, slow it down.

We humans have a very peculiar relationship with aging and death. On the one hand, people spend rather large sums of money on products or services that help them look and feel younger and healthier. In essence, what these people are communicating through their spending habits is that they have a desire to slow down the aging process. Yet any talk of actually reversing the aging process is met with puzzled looks or even dismissal by the very same people. On the other hand, most people dread the condition of death but have resigned themselves to the idea that there is nothing we can do about it. So while we tend to believe that death is unavoidable, we somehow also think that it won’t happen to us for a while longer, and so we put these very important topics on the back burner and refuse to think further about them or consider how to overcome them.

My personal viewpoint is that nothing gets solved without there being some sort of action toward solving it. Problems do not normally resolve themselves.

To those who ask why we should spend money, time, and effort on reversing aging, I shall present three reasons why I believe it is beneficial for us to do so.

Firstly, human beings have always wanted to improve, to grow, and to overcome hardships and challenges. Saying that there is some natural order of things is not a valid argument against reversing the aging process.

Imagine if we had, in the past, accepted a shortened lifespan as the natural order of things. It’s good that we didn’t, because global average life expectancy has more than doubled since the year 1900.

Imagine if we had, in the past, accepted a chaotic, uncomfortable, and dangerous life as the natural order of things. It’s good that we didn’t, because we came up with inventions such as electricity, the Internet, the X-ray, indoor plumbing, heating, and so forth.

Imagine if we had, in the past, accepted our young sons and daughters having their precious lives cut short by illness as the natural order of things. It’s good that we didn’t, because we now have cures for dysentery, malaria, and tuberculosis.

The fact is that the human condition involves us progressing, overcoming limitations, and being better human beings. Hence, it is natural for human beings to want to overcome undesirable situations, and I would imagine that most people would state that poverty, disease, and aging are undesirable.  

Next, reversing the process of aging will give each one of us additional time that we need in order to accomplish other lofty goals. Imagine if you had an additional 10 or 20 young years of life. How much more could you accomplish during that time? We could spend more time on goals such as eliminating poverty, coming up with a cure for cancer, working toward world peace, and so forth. I find it hard to imagine that someone could argue against having more time in life to work on their personal purpose, vision, and mission. Therefore, reversing the process of aging would result in us being able to work on other things that are important to the human race, thereby creating a virtuous cycle of improvement and progress.

Finally, perhaps the most beautiful aspect of the human condition is having a human experience. The human experience includes things such as building relationships with other people, enjoying the splendors of a warm summer afternoon with friends or family, and partaking in any number of stimulating and rewarding activities, such as reading, exercising, and doing charity work.

To those of you who are in a romantic relationship, I ask, wouldn’t you want more time and more opportunities to be with your spouse or partner? Imagine never hearing your partner whisper sweetly in your ear again, or forever losing the overwhelming pleasure of making love to them, or no longer experiencing the rewarding growth you’ve experienced with them since you became a couple.

To those of you who are parents, I ask, wouldn’t you want to ensure that your children live long, happy, and productive lives? Imagine if your son or daughter could have more time and more opportunities to become the person who will finally find a cure for depression, or start a movement that helps brings us closer to world peace, or become a source of inspiration for many people around the world through starting an organization, but they won’t, because we have accepted a “natural order of things.”

To those of you who are actively involved in an ambitious project or important cause that means a lot to you, I ask, wouldn’t you want more time and more energy to work on these things that are meaningful to you? Imagine never being able to work on fulfilling your purpose or vision in life.

There are many more reasons why I believe we should focus on reversing aging, but the three reasons above are a good starting point for us to more seriously consider this most important of issues.

Let’s even assume for a moment that implausible scenarios such as reincarnation and life after death are real. Why wouldn’t we want to live this current life better? I do not believe it is mutually exclusive to believe in life after death and also want to live our current lives better. Throwing up our hands in defeat and accepting things as they currently are does not lead to progress and growth; it leads to atrophy.  

So before we give up the good fight and resign ourselves to an old and decrepit future, we must ask ourselves what we are living for.

If I had to give just one reason for wanting to reverse aging, it would be pretty simple: I love life too damn much.

What’s your reason?

Arin Vahanian is Director of Marketing for the U.S. Transhumanist Party.

“I Am Transhuman” T-Shirt by Duarte Baltazar

“I Am Transhuman” T-Shirt by Duarte Baltazar

logo_bg

Duarte Baltazar


Filmmaker Duarte Baltazar of Utopian Focus has made available the “I Am Transhuman” T-Shirt for sale on Amazon.com, in an effort to fund the creation of further documentary films about the transhumanist movement. (See an example of a short film by Mr. Baltazar, “The Hedonistic Imperative“.) The U.S. Transhumanist Party offers this announcement to its members as another possibility for raising public awareness of transhumanism as well as spreading the expression and hashtag #IAmTranshuman, part of the Transhuman Present project.

Order the “I Am Transhuman” T-Shirt on Amazon here for the price of $19.99.

Color Options: Black, Asphalt, Royal Blue, Cranberry, and Purple

Various male, female, and child sizes are available.

Product Description

  • Solid colors: 100% Cotton; Heather Grey: 90% Cotton, 10% Polyester; All Other Heathers: 50% Cotton, 50% Polyester
  • Imported
  • Machine-wash cold with like colors, dry low heat
  • I Am Transhuman – Transhumanist Movement
  • Art, Ethics, Philosophy, Design T-Shirt
  • Lightweight, Classic fit, Double-needle sleeve and bottom hem

Why I Believe in Transhumanism – Article by Arin Vahanian

Why I Believe in Transhumanism – Article by Arin Vahanian

Arin Vahanian


Someone asked me why I decided to join the Transhumanist Party, and indeed, why I support a movement, which, at first glance, appears to be a fringe movement with members who are out of touch with the needs of the general public.

The truth, however, is far different from what is reported in the media, in books, or even in scholarly articles. Because Transhumanism is the only movement that cares enough about improving the human condition and about building a better future to dedicate itself completely to these monumental tasks. Being human, the human condition is all that we have, and as such, we should cherish and treasure it. Further, the future will be built, but unless we build it in such a way that reflects our values and ethics, we may not be happy with the outcome. This is far too important an outcome to leave to chance, and that is why Transhumanists are so passionate about building a better future.

Going back to the topic of this article, the reason I joined the Transhumanist movement is simple: I love life, and I am dedicated to helping increase the quality of life for every human being on Earth. This is the single most important purpose for me to be working on right now.

Despite what you may have heard, Transhumanism isn’t about becoming a machine; it’s about becoming a better human being.

Since joining this movement, I have been struck by how optimistic, open-minded, and welcoming everyone has been to me. I’ve been accepted with open arms, and people have gone out of their way to help me. It’s a tight-knit community full of passionate, intelligent, and dedicated people who want to work on resolving problems that plague humanity. What could be a more noble purpose?

Despite the negative coverage our movement has received in the media and books, one characteristic that is so consistent across our movement is that our members absolutely adore the sanctity of life. When someone asks me why I am so obsessed with goals such as reversing aging, increasing the human lifespan, dramatically increasing investment in medicine and science, and expanding the human consciousness and intellect, I reply that I am completely and utterly in love with the human experience.

But why do we Transhumanists persevere with such goals?

Because it is cruel and dishonest to say to a person with Stage 4 cancer that soon they will no longer be able to hold their son or daughter in their arms, nor hear their sweet laughter, ever again.

It is cruel and dishonest to tell a quadriplegic that they will never walk.

It is cruel and dishonest to tell someone suffering from severe depression that they should accept a dark, brooding cloud of misery hanging over their head for the rest of their life.

It is cruel and dishonest to tell a child born with a birth defect that they will never live a normal life.

It is cruel and dishonest to tell a student with a learning disability that they should make do with what they have and call them a “special needs” student.

It is cruel and dishonest to tell someone they will never make love to their spouse again, nor hear their voice, nor feel their touch, due to a rare illness that will claim their life far too soon.

In short, I believe it is wrong to be so utterly pessimistic about life and about improving the human condition.

We believe in values such as pacifism, expanding the intellect through increased investment in education, improving the quality of life through science and technology, and improving health services and increasing the human lifespan. How on Earth is any of this fringe?

We must have the courage to proclaim our convictions in front of the rest of the world, because these goals are far too important to leave to chance, and because people all over the world genuinely do want to see progress in these areas.  

The fact is that Transhumanism is the movement that is most in touch with the needs of the general public, because most people, unless they are completely insane, would want to live healthier, be disease-free, increase their intelligence, and build a better future for their children. No, we are not a fringe movement. We are the human movement. After all, Transhumanism has the word “human” in it. And that to me means being a better human.

It is wrong to be defeatist and throw our hands up in resignation, because nothing of significance was ever accomplished by being pessimistic, capitulating, or quitting prematurely. Amazing inventions, advances in medicine, and improvements in quality of life came about precisely because we, as humans, did not give up, but rather, fought for what was right. And increasing the quality of life for all humans is right.

I am a Transhumanist because I am a human being, and because I love the human experience. And this is something I will never apologize for. In fact, this is something I will continue to fight for as long as I am alive. Which, hopefully, will be for a very long time.

Why am I a Transhumanist? Because simply put, I love life too damn much.

Arin Vahanian is Director of Marketing for the U.S. Transhumanist Party.

Is the Soul Digital or Analogue? – Article by C. H. Antony

Is the Soul Digital or Analogue? – Article by C. H. Antony

logo_bgC. H. Antony


I am probably not the ideal Transhumanist; I do believe that I have a soul, that it is more the essence of me than the sum of my neurons and how they interact with each other to create my thoughts, and that it is an extremely fragile thing. Should I die and preserve myself to be revived at a later date, I fear that I would never know of the success or failure of that endeavor. That a living breathing thinking person who acts like me and reasons like me will rejoin society is not in question; I only wonder that I might miss it as my essence passes on into some other form of existence… or worse – not. I do not believe that a digital substrate will, in fact, carry my soul on uninterrupted.

I want to explore the question of the soul for a moment. In The Singularity is Near (2005), Ray Kurzweil stated that the Calculations Per Second of the human brain are in the vicinity of 10 to the 14th power, based on the assumption, and rightly so, that each neuron in the brain could be considered a digital on/off or 1/0. Around six years ago, we began seeing articles describing microtubules in the axons of the neuronal cells that seemed to have quantum properties I freely admit to not understanding. I cheerfully invite anyone to correct me on this, but it seems that while the neuron either fires or doesn’t as it communicates with the neighboring cell, the microtubule seems to exist in a sort Schrödinger-like state of possibilities – like a multiplexing wire that might convey one piece of information by doing so at a particular combination of wattage, voltage, and resistance, then convey a completely different set of instructions with another combination of the same. It seems to me that if every neuron is operating in a digital on/off state, then 1014  computations per second (CPS) are likely given the average number of neuronal cells in the human brain, and if that number might be horribly wrong because of what we now know of the activity within the axon – then this suggests that superposition state of neural activity might very well be the essence of our consciousness and, if interrupted, could be lost and what remains would be something else only a comfort to those we would have left behind.

I agree that an entirely biological existence is not only a seriously limiting factor in our future development, but also something we are destined to outgrow and will do so. However, I would say that my ideal manifestation of this is a seamless combination of man and machine. Medical technology could eliminate all the senescence we suffer to the point where the next logical step is enhancement over a timeless organic form. I, for one, would hate to live for hundreds of years and gather all the knowledge and experience of those times only to die because of some future equivalent of a drunk driver. That in itself is good enough reason to fortify my existence any way I can. If that means that my body must be replaced with an artificial one, so be it. But, I want to keep my squishy, limited, fragile brain! I want my cake and to eat it, gleefully, with a nearly indestructible form that doesn’t need the cake, won’t get fat from it, and still let’s me enjoy the flavors and textures as I do now. I want to enjoy all the many hedonistic joys freely and with only greater precision than my limited biological form can experience.

I believe we’re seeing this very trend emerge and that the collective instinct of man is far more ready to accept an enhanced human/cyborg than uploading oneself to a purely artificial substrate. Evidence of this can be seen in the amazing promise of Elon Musk’s Neuralink project, the recent X-Prize challenge for a robot avatar, and the many amazing advancements in prosthetic limbs and organs. As I previously stated, medical technology will soon overcome senescence, allowing our tissues to go on indefinitely, so to essentially cure our brain of degeneration, enhance it with a neural mesh, and go about our lives in a perfected cybernetic body akin to Ghost in the Shell: Altered Architecture is probably a pretty good direction to be steering ourselves as Transhumanists. It’s also the most likely Next Step, if you will, considering how well society is conditioned for these themes. I would certainly feel more comfortable with my own enhanced mind in a perfect and durable body that can be easily upgraded and modified as the centuries pass.

So now I ask the members of this community to bring their thoughts here. What is your ideal existence?

C. H. Antony is a member of the U.S. Transhumanist Party. He may be contacted here

“Squeak” – Art by Laura Katrin Weston, a.k.a. Katrin Brunier

“Squeak” – Art by Laura Katrin Weston, a.k.a. Katrin Brunier

Laura Katrin Weston




Commentary by Gennady Stolyarov II, Chairman, United States Transhumanist Party: “Squeak” is a print by Dr. Laura Katrin Weston, a.k.a. Katrin Brunier, the original exemplar of which I received in November 2017 due to my donation to the successful MouseAge crowdfunding campaign by Lifespan.io.

It is fitting for a project on mouse longevity to involve at least one image of mice – creatures whom life has unfortunately dealt a bad hand, due to their short lifespans (only 3 years for even long-lived mice in the absence of medical intervention), difficulty in getting along with humans, and unnecessary attrition due to disposal practices after lab experiments. “Squeak” invites the viewer to appreciate mice a bit more; if we can extend their lives significantly, we stand a decent chance of achieving dramatic extension of our own lifespans.  Perhaps we can also give some of the mice a break by using photographic markers of aging in experiments, as the MouseAge project seeks to do.

Here, the mice are depicted scurrying along a narrow circular path. The golden circle, with rays emanating outward represents perhaps the great hope that these creatures unknowingly provide to us. One may wonder, as I have done over many months of reflecting on this work, whether these are mutant, two-tailed mice, or whether they each just have their ordinary curly tails, and the track along which they move might simply be painted in the same colors and textures as their tails. (Well, in actuality it is indeed painted that way!) Mutant or not, these mice are rather extraordinary in having become emblems of a species that has added much to our understanding. Unlike most of their brethren to date, these mice have earned their extreme longevity through Laura Katrin Weston’s brush.

You can find more work by Dr. Laura Katrin Weston at the Katrin Brunier Gallery, an Ethical Investment-Grade Art Gallery for the Neo-Renaissance Era (see its Instagram page). Proceeds from art sales at the Katrin Brunier Gallery will go to support causes such as medical research and conservation.

Will We Build the Future, or Will the Future Build Us? – Article by Arin Vahanian

Will We Build the Future, or Will the Future Build Us? – Article by Arin Vahanian

Arin Vahanian


There is an idea or perception bandied about the general public that unstoppable technological forces are already upon us like a runaway train, threatening to derail our way of life and everything we have ever known, and that there is nothing we can do about it.

However, I would like to offer some hope and at the same time dispel this seemingly apocalyptic scenario.

There appear to be two main schools of thought when we discuss the future; the Ray Kurzweil school of thought, which states that the future will evolve as it will and that we will reach Singularity by a certain date, and the Peter Thiel school of thought, which says that the future won’t be built unless we build it.

I would like to add upon Mr. Thiel’s idea by saying that the future will indeed be built, but unless we, as a society, a human race, and a world, join forces to build a future we would like to live in and which reflects our values, we will indeed have a future, but perhaps not one we are completely comfortable with.

Thus, this is a call to action for not only those who are actively involved in the fields of technology, science, and engineering, but all people around the world, because the sum of our collective actions will decide the fate of the world, and the future we live in. Whether we want to admit it, all of us are, on some level, responsible for how the world develops every day.

I urge those of you who may have resigned yourselves to the idea that there is nothing you can do to help change the trajectory of the world to take a look with new eyes. There is always something all of us can do, because every day we are interacting with others, building relationships, helping to create products, working on resolving problems that affect humanity, contributing to the success of an organization, company, or family, and performing actions that help the world develop, no matter on how small a scale that might be.

Everyone on Earth has a role to play in the creation of our future. That is what you are here for – to help fulfill your personal vision and mission while also contributing to the development of the world. That is how important you are.  

So the next time someone remarks that the writing is on the wall and that we should just accept that we have no say in how the world evolves, please remember that we are all architects of our own future, which hasn’t even been written yet. How it will be written depends on the actions every one of us takes every day. Therefore, the question we should be asking ourselves every day is, what kind of future will we build? And then, of course, after answering this question, we should not waste any time in building that future we have envisioned.

Arin Vahanian is Director of Marketing for the U.S. Transhumanist Party.

An Interview with Dr. Laura Weston by Nicola Bagalà

An Interview with Dr. Laura Weston by Nicola Bagalà

Laura Katrin Weston
Nicola Bagalà


Editor’s Note: The U.S. Transhumanist Party is pleased to feature this interview with Dr. Laura Katrin Weston, one of our strongest supporters, by Nicola Bagalà of the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation.  We are particularly thrilled that Dr. Weston cited the U.S. Transhumanist Party Discussion Panel on Art and Transhumanism as one of her major inspirations for taking her artistic endeavors to the next level: “I have always wanted to create a place where others could also allow their logical and creative worlds to collide; this is often reflected in a lot of transhumanist philosophy. The idea was solidified after I took part in a discussion on art and transhumanism as part of the US Transhumanist Party panel. I was greatly inspired by the amazing individuals around me and wanted to potentiate those ideals.”  This article was originally published by the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation (LEAF).

                   ~ Gennady Stolyarov II, Chairman, U.S. Transhumanist Party, June 15, 2018

The belief that science and art run on parallel tracks is largely unsubstantiated, and Dr. Laura Weston—a scientist, an artist, and a LEAF volunteer—is a great example of this. Dr. Weston is both a molecular pathologist and a painter, and she has recently launched her own art gallery. Being a passionate life extensionist and, more generally, a transhumanist, Laura undertook this project because of her belief that art can and should take part in shaping a better future for everyone; art hosted in her gallery will certainly do this in the traditional way of conveying a message but also more directly, since part of the proceeds from sales will be destined for conservation charities, medical research, and even LEAF—which we are all most grateful for.

Artists and art enthusiasts who want to make a difference for important causes, including life extension, now have their chance to do so by contributing their own art or buying their favorite works. Pieces hosted at Katrin Brunier—Laura’s nom de plume—are examples of abstract works inspired by transhumanist themes; you can admire a sample below or visit the gallery’s Instagram page.

Jupatian Storms

For the occasion, we decided to ask Laura a few questions about herself, her work, and, of course, her views on aging and life extension.

Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?

I am Dr. Laura Weston, M.D. with a specialty in pathology: molecular and biochemical diagnostics to be more specific. I’m also a professional singer, a professional artist for over 15 years, a medical researcher, and a transhumanist. I also go by the name Katrin Brunier for my artistic endeavors.

Originally, you trained as a painter and singer; later on, you pursued a career as a molecular pathologist, albeit without abandoning your art. Was this something you had planned, or did something happen that led you to science?

I was always torn between the creative and logical worlds; I have dual-sided brain dominance, which is quite unusual. I was described as a child as a polymath with no solid direction. I was also born with synesthesia, so I process all information from music to mathematical concepts in shape and color. I went to art school while my mother was terminally ill as a form of respite; however, the more I learned about her illness, the more I became enamored with the human body and molecular mechanisms at the smallest level. I guess you could say that I fell into it as a career path. I also wanted to try to help others to never have to experience the kind of loss my family did by being able to have the power to change things. I also suffer from a very rare genetic disease myself, that I continually seek to learn more about in order to help others.

Your art is inspired by transhumanist themes. What are the ones you care about the most?

Fundamentally, I believe in unifying humanity as a race by eliminating chronic illnesses that now affect, I believe, the majority of the population. Nearly all chronic disease stems from the same molecular mechanism, and by fully understanding this, we could eliminate cancers, age-related degeneration, Alzheimer’s, and thousands of other conditions that destroy our quality of life and take our loved ones away too soon.

As stated on your art gallery’s website, you host works of art focused on “themes of human advancements in pioneering knowledge, trans-humanism, unconditionality, our place in the universe, sensory perception and the neo-renaissance.” How was this idea born, and how well has it been received thus far?

This idea is essentially an outward expression of the creative and logical duality that I always carried around. Often, people are pressured to pick one; however, the biggest discoveries and advancements have often come from a fusion of both of those systems working synergistically. I have always wanted to create a place where others could also allow their logical and creative worlds to collide; this is often reflected in a lot of transhumanist philosophy. Thea idea was solidified after I took part in a discussion on art and transhumanism as part of the US Transhumanist Party panel. I was greatly inspired by the amazing individuals around me and wanted to potentiate those ideals. So far, I have had enquiries from major art bodies to host works, contact from other talented transhumanists who want to donate their work to raise money for medical research, and, best of all, a few commissions already that will allow me to donate to the wonderful people who do the hard work and research that will benefit us all.

Transhumanists range from those who wish to upload their minds to machines to far more moderate ones who support the use of technology to improve human health, society, the ecosystem and other scientific endeavors. Where do you fall on this spectrum, and what is transhumanism to you?

I don’t think we should run before we can walk. While the more extravagant ideas of transhumanism appeal to me in terms of furthering human knowledge – the most powerful force in the world – I believe that we need to tackle the huge chronic illness crisis that is pushing our health systems to the breaking point and ruining people’s lives. The gift of being able to eliminate the decay of our bodies should be used to stabilize our situation, our well being, and the population and to stop overusing the resources we have on this planet, first and foremost. Applied transhumanism could achieve the elimination of human suffering and may even be the next step in our evolution and development as a species.

A recurring theme in the transhumanist and futurist community is that, within the next thirty or forty years, the world will go through radically transformative changes because of AI, biotechnology, etc. Is this something you too expect?

It’s already happening around us – in the field of molecular and quantum biology/pathology, we are already implementing AI to work out problems that it would take months to solve manually. I can find errors in your genome and diagnose diseases before they have even begun to manifest. This also has applications for every industry and even the conservation of our beautiful planet. Given time, I hope that it will seep into other parts of society, and I am so excited to see the positive changes it could bring to the world. Look how far we have come in the last twenty years; imagine what it will be like in just ten years from now.

American biologist Edward Wilson said, “The real problem of humanity is the following: we have paleolithic emotions; medieval institutions; and god-like technology.” However, he also said, “This planet can be a paradise in the 22nd century.” Do you think that we can actually achieve this, despite the issues mentioned in his first quote?

Let’s go down a little rabbit hole here: there is a metaphorical concept in Hermetic philosophy that humans will master the world around them; however, the payoff will be that they will not master themselves. Unless this is balanced, we are still at the whim of everything around us. Indeed, this planet, our society, our race could indeed create a utopian environment IF we accept how we actually function as creatures. Knowledge of the self, in terms of the human body and brain, allows our consciousness to control it. If we all had better self-awareness, open access to knowledge and consequent self-control, then the medieval paradigms would fall away, because with this knowledge, they would become archaic and useless. Only when that shift has taken place, and humanity views itself as a race and a whole, can that vision be realized. The technology exists; we just need to catch up.

When did you realize that aging is a problem in which we should intervene?

The molecular and biological process of aging holds the secrets and blueprints to the cause of nearly all non-pathogen-related disease in human beings. I developed these ideas as I gained more knowledge on the subject. When you have the blueprint, you can find a way to manipulate it. On a more personal level, my work as a doctor has exposed me to the worst forms of human suffering. If there is a way to prevent it from happening, count me in.

What was your attitude towards aging before then?

I naturally tend to think very abstractly; it was never a concept that seemed to be an automatic given. Rather, it always seemed to be a result of a very primitive blueprint being affected by degenerative forces around it. It was always a process that fascinated me and something that I felt could be deconstructed and explored. Of course it is part of the current natural balance, epigenetic factors and current standards of human living; however, I never understood why, given how much it degrades our quality of existence, it wasn’t given more focus. Surely, it makes more sense to find the root of a problem rather than temporarily suppressing the symptoms?

You’re a medical doctor. As such, do you agree with the view of aging as a disease or, more specifically, a co-morbid syndrome, and why is this?

If one takes the current model of medical nomenclature, technically, you could classify aging as a co-morbid syndrome. I’m not saying that this is absolute; we do not have enough evidence, nor may we ever. However, if we choose to look at it this way, it could be an excellent model for scientific exploration and maybe even total intervention. It would be foolish to draw a line just yet, but we would be just as foolish to not explore that possibility.

Where do you think we are in terms of bringing newly developed therapies and ways of thinking into clinical practice, and why?

We are on the verge of a huge change in medical systems. Research and clinical trials are translating into treatments and protocols faster than ever before. However, in my opinion, this is not happening fast enough because our priorities are all in the wrong place. This is actually an issue that I will be tackling in a book that I am currently working on and will hopefully publish next year; it explains the benefits of applying transhumanism to current clinical practice and systems for the management of chronic illness.

What can be done to bridge the gap between the people developing these new technologies and the people on the front line using them?

Fundamentally, it unfortunately all comes down to money. Raising money to get this research initiated in the first place is our biggest issue. Our systems of implementation within the evidence-based medicine world are very good; however, there is a disconnect when it comes to clinical practice. This is down to severe underfunding in areas that actually allow the data to be processed into a protocol to apply these new technologies and compounds in the safest way possible for patients.

Some people think that it’s premature to give estimates, however rough, as to when we will have defeated aging; others say that it’s gerontologists’ duty to give the public their best guesstimates in order to catalyze progress. What do you think?

Guesstimates can be good and bad. Once again, however, they can be used to create models for scientific exploration to actually give us a more reliable forecast. I think that the best way to summarize this is that when in unknown territory, join the dots as best you can, but do not heed it as gospel.

Do you think that two to three decades might be enough to have proof of working rejuvenation therapies, or do you expect that more time will be necessary?

It is an absolute possibility, given our current exponential trajectory and the developments that are linking the quantum and molecular world to the biological. Ten years ago, we couldn’t get our genomes screened from the comfort of our own homes; now, we can. The data that we are able to collect, store and analyze is exponentially growing every year. Even if we don’t have a reliable therapy, we will have a far better understanding of the root cause and be able to make a start at stabilizing those processes.

What is the biggest bottleneck to progress in research to end age-related diseases?

Lack of funding and lack of accessibility to education. We need open science and to educate people to allow them to come to their own conclusions as to what aging actually is, not the societal view we currently have. As a race, we need to re-prioritize our resources and enable everyone to have the right to knowledge.

Do you have a take-home message for our readers?

First, thank you for allowing me this opportunity, and an even bigger thanks to those who have taken the time to engage with me on these topics.

If anything I have spoken about resonates with you, I encourage you to support charities like LEAF that allow these changes to happen in the world. Even a tiny contribution makes a big impact. This is something that we can only achieve by working together and supporting each other.

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We’re grateful to Laura for her time and for her generosity in supporting LEAF’s work, both through her volunteer efforts and her gallery’s donations. We wish her the best of luck with her endeavors.

About Nicola Bagalà

Nicola Bagalà has been an enthusiastic supporter and advocate of rejuvenation science since 2011. Although his preferred approach to treating age related diseases is Aubrey de Grey’s suggested SENS platform, he is very interested in any other potential approach as well. In 2015, he launched the blog Rejuvenaction to advocate for rejuvenation and to answer common concerns that generally come with the prospect of vastly extended healthy lifespans. Originally a mathematician graduated from Helsinki University, his scientific interests range from cosmology to AI, from drawing and writing to music, and he always complains he doesn’t have enough time to dedicate to all of them which is one of the reasons he’s into life extension. He’s also a computer programmer and web developer. All the years spent learning about the science of rejuvenation have sparked his interest in biology, in which he’s planning to get a university degree.

About LIFE EXTENSION ADVOCACY FOUNDATION (LEAF)

In 2014, the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation was established as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to promoting increased healthy human lifespan through fiscally sponsoring longevity research projects and raising awareness regarding the societal benefits of life extension. In 2015 they launched Lifespan.io, the first nonprofit crowdfunding platform focused on the biomedical research of aging.

They believe that this will enable the general public to influence the pace of research directly. To date they have successfully supported four research projects aimed at investigating different processes of aging and developing therapies to treat age-related diseases.

The LEAF team organizes educational events, takes part in different public and scientific conferences, and actively engages with the public on social media in order to help disseminate this crucial information. They initiate public dialogue aimed at regulatory improvement in the fields related to rejuvenation biotechnology.

Thoughts on North Korean Diplomacy – Article by R. Nicholas Starr

Thoughts on North Korean Diplomacy – Article by R. Nicholas Starr

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R. Nicholas Starr


Editor’s Note: The U.S. Transhumanist Party features this perspective from R. Nicholas Starr in accord with our strong opposition to weapons of mass destruction and to the threat of nuclear war – as, for instance, expressed in Section IV of our Platform. The U.S. Transhumanist Party thus welcomes the progress of negotiations that could considerably reduce the probability of a nuclear conflict between the United States and North Korea. 

~ Gennady Stolyarov II, Chairman, United States Transhumanist Party, June 13, 2018

I don’t like, trust, or support Trump. But his approach with North Korea might just work.

From 2004 to 2011 I was an intelligence analyst for the USAF. As such I spent a lot of time reading and briefing about North Korea, especially during my time stationed at Kadena AB, Okinawa, Japan. While most of my knowledge was focused on specific aspects and activities, if you spend enough time reading about a regime, you begin to get a sense of their point of view.

The US military spends a lot of time and money on preparing for a North Korean threat. Constant simulations on how to destroy the North are a provocation. How would you feel if someone was practicing the best way to destroy you, every year, for decades? Not only does it present a clear military threat, we must remember that there are innocent lives at risk – innocent people that live completely in the dark and don’t really know why these exercises happen, Just extremely limited information, often paired with editorial fear mongering, that is distributed through Rodong Sinmun. Any objective observer would notice that the years of sabre-rattling have not created peace, but exacerbated the issue. A promise to limit or completely end these exercises seems like a rational decision.

Treating Kim Jong-un as an equal also seems like the right thing to do. After all, he is the leader of his country, a country tired of fighting to justify its mere existence, regardless of how he stepped into the role. He isn’t his father or grandfather, even though there is significant pressure to be so. He is only playing the hand he was born into. So coming into a summit with a positive attitude towards Kim just might do the trick into diffusing international tension.

From Kim’s point of view, he likely feels weakened now that seismic activity, caused by his underground testing, has made his nuclear program unsustainable, and so he is looking to come out of the situation in the best way possible. He may also see that the work of his predecessors has not had the desired effect. Kim, much like Trump, might believe that a new course of action is necessary. So if Trump needs to lose some military and political leverage to make it happen, then fine.

HOWEVER, if Trump steps out of the strict lines of total peace toward North Korea, we risk a swift decline into war. And let’s face it, Trump has a history of saying one thing and doing the opposite. He also tells people exactly what they want to hear and does what he wants anyways. So the risk of breaking whatever agreement was made is high and very real. If ever there was a time for Trump to be honest, it is now, because Kim Jong-un will hold him to it. The fate of peace stands upon the edge of a knife. Stray but a little, and it will fail, to the ruin of all. I can’t imagine a better time for Tolkien’s wisdom than right now. This is the closest we have come to resolving the issue, and previous methods have proven ineffective. So maybe it’s worth a try.

Ryan Starr (R. Nicholas Starr) is the is the leader of the Transhumanist Party of Colorado and founder of the Transhumanists of the Sierras

“Teeming” – Art by Laura Katrin Weston, a.k.a. Katrin Brunier

“Teeming” – Art by Laura Katrin Weston, a.k.a. Katrin Brunier

Laura Katrin Weston



Commentary by Gennady Stolyarov II, Chairman of the United States Transhumanist Party:
“Teeming” is a print by Dr. Laura Katrin Weston, a.k.a. Katrin Brunier, the original exemplar which I received in November 2017 due to my donation to the successful MouseAge crowdfunding campaign by Lifespan.io.

Although some may consider the plants depicted in this print to be weeds, Laura Katrin Weston has painted their flowers beautifully. Such plants proliferate in a teeming, but ultimately ephemeral manner – yet this print presents a view that can be enjoyed indefinitely, in effect taming the weeds and presenting their best imagined attributes for our appreciation.

You can find more work by Dr. Laura Katrin Weston at the Katrin Brunier Gallery, an Ethical Investment-Grade Art Gallery for the Neo-Renaissance Era (see its Instagram page). Proceeds from art sales at the Katrin Brunier Gallery will go to support causes such as medical research and conservation.