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Progress in the Politics of Abundance – Presentation by Gennady Stolyarov II

Progress in the Politics of Abundance – Presentation by Gennady Stolyarov II

Gennady Stolyarov II


Gennady Stolyarov II, Chairman of the United States Transhumanist Party / Transhuman Party (USTP), delivered this presentation, entitled “Progress in the Politics of Abundance“, during the August 24, 2019, Wellness and Longevity Seminar in Burbank, California, to commemorate the publication of The Transhumanism Handbook. Mr. Stolyarov spoke to update the audience on recent USTP activities in 2019 since the writing of his chapter, entitled “The United States Transhumanist Party and the Politics of Abundance” which is available for free download.

Some of the subjects addressed in Mr. Stolyarov’s presentation are the necessity and challenges of overcoming the evolved mindset of scarcity – the zero-sum mentality – in politics, the USTP’s #IAmTranshuman campaign, its successful effort to amend Nevada Assembly Bill 226 to remove the prohibition against voluntary microchip implantation, and its Transhumanist Symbols project, of which the products are freely available here.

The presentation slides are not fully visible in the video but can be accessed and downloaded here.

Find out more about The Transhumanism Handbook.

Join the U.S. Transhumanist Party for free, no matter where you reside. Those who join by September 22, 2019, will be eligible to vote in the upcoming USTP Presidential Primary.

From Darwinian Greed to Altruistic Greed: the Strangest Period So Far in Our Planet’s History – Article by Hilda Koehler

From Darwinian Greed to Altruistic Greed: the Strangest Period So Far in Our Planet’s History – Article by Hilda Koehler

Hilda Koehler


We are smack-dab in the middle of what might be the oddest period of our planet’s history thus far. The last 200 years have seen more rapid technological and scientific advancement than all the 3.5 billion prior years of life on Earth combined. And that technological progress is set to increase even more exponentially within our lifetimes. In the span of my grandmother’s life, humanity has put a man on the Moon, and now we’re having serious discussions about Moon bases and terraforming Mars to start a colony there. Within my own life thus far, I’ve gone from using a dial-up box-shaped computer in my kindergarten years to learning about the exponential progress made in quantum computing and the invention of a material that could potentially be a non-organic substrate to download human thoughts into.

I think that John L. Smart is essentially correct in the theories he puts force in his evolutionary-developmental (“EvoDevo”) transcension hypothesis. There seems to be a kind of biological Moore’s law that applies to human intelligence. If you chart the developments in human evolution from 200,000 years ago till the present, the jump from hunting and gathering to civilization occurred at an immensely fast rate. And the subsequent jump from pre-scientific civilization to the contemporary technological age has been the most astronomical one thus far. And with that astronomical jump in humanity’s technological progress has come an incredible leap in humanity’s moral progress.

The irony of our strange epoch

One of the most ironic aspects about the current climate crisis I like to point out is this: thank goodness that the climate crisis is happening now, and not in the 1500s. That seems like a rather ironic or even flippant thing to say. But thank goodness that the two greatest existential threats to all sentient life on Earth, the existence of nuclear weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) and global warming, are occurring in the 21st century. Because we are living in a time period where democracies are the most common political model across the globe. Public protests such as those led by Extinction Rebellion and Greta Thunberg’s climate strike movement have proliferated across the globe. Can you imagine what would have happened if this order of climate catastrophe had occurred a thousand years ago, when monarchies were the default political model? Can you imagine what would happen if you had tyrannical monarchies across the globe, with kings and lords as the primary stakeholders in climate-destroying corporations? It doesn’t seem likely that Greta Thunberg and her ilk would have made much progress in pushing for a pro-climate action zeitgeist in a regime where criticizing the reigning monarch automatically meant decapitation.

Furthermore, we’re extremely fortunate to be living in an era where science is accelerating fast enough to pioneer carbon-capture technology, and more recently, the geoengineering as a viable solution. To paraphrase Michio Kaku, “the dinosaurs got wiped out by the meteor shower; but they didn’t have advanced technology which could detect and disintegrate meteors long before they enter the Earth’s orbit. That’s something current human beings can work on building.” The same is true of the current scramble for climate engineers to churn out anti-pollution and temperature-lowering technologies.

How the technological pursuit of a post-scarcity world is encourages altruism and egalitarianism

I often write about how the last 150 years of global society have seen an exponential jump in the perpetuation of universal human rights. And that’s because it’s nothing short of amazing. Most of the world’s major civilizations which had political and economically subjugated women, ethnic minorities, and the working class for the past 6,000 years suddenly had a change of heart overnight, seemingly. It’s no coincidence that the proliferation of universal civil rights and the criminalization of interpsersonal violence against women and minorities coincided with the Post-Industrial Revolution. As resource scarcity has been drastically reduced in the contemporary technological era, so, too, has the Darwinian impetus towards domination and subjugation of minority groups.

We have shifted from a violent Darwinian greed in the form of the colonization of minority groups, to a kind of altruistic greed. Altruistic greed is characterized by an unabetting desire for ever-higher qualities of life; but which can be made widely available to the masses. The clearest example of this is the advent of modern healthcare, beginning with the mass administration of vaccinations for diseases like polio. As Steven Pinker points out, infant mortality rates and deaths from child birth have plummeted throughout that world in the last 50 years. Across the world, the proliferation of technological infrastructure has made public transport systems faster and safer than they ever were before. Altruistic greed is a major driving force for many in the transhumanist community. Most transhumanists are advocates of making radical life extension and cutting edge medical therapies affordable and accessible to everyone. The fundamental driving principle behind transhumanism is that humanity can transcend its biological limitations through rapid technological advancement; but the benefits reaped must be made as accessible as possible.

A reason often cited by nihilists who say that we should accept human extinction is on the grounds that human beings hold the glaring track record of being the most gut-wrenchingly cruel of all the species on Earth. This is empirically and philosophically indisputable. No other species shares a historical laundry list of genocide campaigns, slavery, rape, domestic abuse, and egregious socio-economic inequality on par with human beings.

But since the post-World War II era, something miraculous happened. We became kind and peaceful; and this impetus towards kindness and peace proliferated globally. After 10,000 years of treating women as the property of their husbands, it became possible for women to get voted into positions of power across the globe, and marital rape became criminalized in an increasing number of countries. After 10,000 years of holding corporal punishment as an essential part of child-rearing in nearly every human society, an increasing number of democracies have begun to enact child-abuse laws against striking children.

We still have long ways to go.

Sweatshop labor exploitation and the sex trafficking of females remain major human-rights issues today. But an increasing number of international law bodies and humanitarian groups are cracking down on them and fighting to eradicate them permanently. They are no longer seen as “business as usual” practices that are essential parts of human society which shouldn’t cause anyone to bat an eye; despite the fact that slavery has been a staple institution of nearly every civilization for the last ten millennia.

There are, of course, many aspects of ethical progress in which human beings are still lagging sorely behind, besides human trafficking. Although wars are far less common and less glamorized than they were in millennia past, conflicts are still raging on in Congo, and dictatorial regimes still exist. Income inequality is now greater than it was at any other time in human history. Another of the great ironies of the contemporary technological era is that we now produce enough food to feed 10 billion people, but there are still 795 million people in the world suffering from malnutrition. As much as 40% of all the food we produce is wasted unnecessarily.

The exploitation of animals and the thoughtless destruction of their habitats is one respect in which humanity has actually backslid in terms of ethical progress in the last 70 years. Since the Industrial Revolution and the explosion of the human population, humans have radically decimated the earth’s natural biomass, and one million species are now facing the threat of extinction due to human industrial activity.

Nevertheless, one hopes that Steven Pinker is essentially correct in his assessment of humanity’s rapid moral growth over the last 200 years. It could be said that it’s not necessarily the case that primates are inherently more predisposed to cruelty than all other species. Rape, infanticide, and killing rival males during mating season are common amongst many species of birds, reptiles, and mammals, as David Pearce points out. It’s just that human beings have the capacity to inflict exponential amounts on damage on other humans and animals because of our exceptional intelligence. Intelligence makes possible exploitation. Human intelligence has allowed us to exploit other human beings and sentient beings for millennia. But human intelligence is what has also enabled us to radically improve healthcare, longevity, and universal human rights across the globe.

The long history of suffering endured by sentient life on Earth is why the far-flung topic of technological resurrection is a major point of discussion amongst transhumanists. We believe that all sentient creatures which have endured considerable physical suffering, manmade or naturally-inflicted, deserve a second shot at life in the name of humanitarian justice.

There’s still much room for progress.

At present we seem to be entering a bottleneck era where we might have to drastically reduce our currently excessive consumption of the Earth’s resources, in light of the current climate crisis. The good news is that a growing number of us are realizing the looming existential threat of climate change and doubling down on combating it, as I’d mentioned earlier. The even better news is that an increasing number of bioethicists, particularly in the transhumanist movement, are now touting a permanent solution to the worst of humanity’s selfish, overly aggressive monkey-brain impulses. This seems to be just in the nick of time, given that this coincides with an era where humanity has access to nuclear arms capable of obliterating all life on Earth with the press of a Big Red Button.

My biggest hope for humanity is not only that our exponential technological progress will persist, but that our ethical and altruistic progress will continue in tandem with it. We have gotten to a stage of technological development where the forces of nature have become almost entirely subjugated, and our own impetus towards aggression has become the single greatest existential threat. It could be that every single sufficiently advanced alien civilization that is capable of exploiting all the natural resources on its home planets or inventing WMDs is eventually forced to cognitively recondition itself towards pacifism and altruism.

There is an ongoing debate in the existential-risk movement about whether or not SETI or METI could be unintentionally endangering all life on Earth by attempting to make contact with alien civilizations several orders of magnitude more advanced than ours. The analogy commonly cited is how the first European explorers of the Americas massacred scores of indigenous tribespeople who didn’t have guns. But the opposite could also be true. It could be that once other alien civilizations achieve a post-scarcity global economy, the neurobiological Darwinian impetus to colonize less developed groups gets steadily replaced by an altruistic impetus to ensure the survival and flourishing of all sentient species on that planet. We can’t tell for sure until we meet another alien species. But on our part, we’ve yet to ride out the tidal wave of the strangest period of Earth’s history. As we take our next steps forward into a radically different phase of human civilization, we gain an ever greater ability to control our own development as a species. Here’s to Pinker’s hope that we’re going in the right direction, and will do our best to head that way indefinitely.

Hilda Koehler is a fourth-year political science major at the National University of Singapore. She is a proud supporter of the transhumanist movement and aims to do her best to promote transhumanism and progress towards the Singularity.

2019 New Year’s Message – A Call for Medical Progress and Preservation of the Good – Article by Victor Bjoerk

2019 New Year’s Message – A Call for Medical Progress and Preservation of the Good – Article by Victor Bjoerk

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Victor Bjoerk


I celebrated the end of 2018 like normally with neuroscientist Anders Sandberg and several other “transhumanists” or “technoprogressive people” in Stockholm!

Why am I in that place to start with? Well, I’m quite frustrated with the human condition in the first place; I’ve always questioned everything from social norms and different kinds of problems in the world, and there’s still so much misery around that we need to unite and fix. (I know it sounds cliché, but it’s true!)

As people reading this know, the vast majority of human misery worldwide today occurs due to our bodies damaging themselves with the passage of time, the biological process we call aging. This occurs because evolution has no goals and our ancestors died at the age of 30-40 prehistorically, and therefore there was no pressure for evolution to create humans that could repair themselves molecularly to live thousands of years. The closest we get among Eukaryotes/Vertebrates are Greenland sharks, which can live to 500+ years; that is easy to understand since they have no predators and just have to open their mouths to get their daily food. On the opposite side we have as a prominent example the mouse, with a very poor molecular repair system and subsequent 2.5-year lifespan, easy to understand when you realize how dangerous life is in the wild if having a mouse body.

Thanks to our technology, we have created the “paradise Greenland shark scenario” for humans during the past century essentially, creating very comfortable existences where nearly everyone survives.

So if you’re 25 years old, life is really great nowadays in Western countries (unless you like to complain about everything!); the existential risks are so low in the absence of aging that you would live many thousands of years just by being a young person living in Sweden.

So I’ve worked a lot in nursing homes both before and during my studies in molecular biology, and what those people have to endure would be strictly illegal in most countries if we knew how to change it. Imagine if, for example, Saudi Arabia allowed its citizens to age while the Western world had abolished it; wouldn’t Amnesty International intervene?

But what can be done with the human body? Well, I assume quite a lot! We are seeing so many people who can’t stand the medical monopoly and the 17-year bench-to-bedside status quo, which isn’t an abstract academic complaint but which impact their daily lives, so they start self-experimenting with, for example, senolytic medicines to kill their senescent cells, making themselves “younger” in certain aspects, which is pretty cool!

However I’m not someone who constantly calls for change and “progress”; I mean, if something is nice, then why not keep it? As far as I’m concerned, for example, the beautiful architecture from the past can continue to stand for thousands more years. These buildings fulfill their purpose and look nice; I’m quite conservative on those points – but please accelerate the medical research, and it is crucial to spot the techniques that actually do work and to not waste resources on hype!

2018 has brought me many good things, those which one can call “achievements” and those which are not visible. The Eurosymposium on Healthy Aging in Brussels became a success! (And there will be some events during 2019 that I am also announcing for everyone who enjoyed it!)

I’ve been learning a lot about CRISPR and many other techniques both practically and theoretically, though I have not exactly used them to change the world. Medical progress takes forever to achieve, and it’s not exactly helped by a massive web of bureaucracy/hierarchies/prestige/laws, all contributing to slowing down progress for people in need. What can really be done? One needs to focus on the positive and go where the biotech companies can succeed!

So if things are working out for me as I hope now in 2019, I hope being able to really work full time to impact the longevity industry, I really feel like an overripe fruit that needs to get things done, because implementing stuff is what matters and not becoming some passive “longevity encyclopedia”. I’ll keep everyone as usually updated!

So happy new 2019 everyone! And make sure to take good care of yourselves!

Victor Bjoerk has worked for the Gerontology Research Group, the Longevity Reporter, and the Fraunhofer-Institut für Zelltherapie und Immunologie. He has promoted awareness throughout Europe of emerging biomedical research and the efforts to reverse biological aging. 

Fourth Enlightenment Salon – Political Segment: Discussion on Artificial Intelligence in Politics, Voting Systems, and Democracy

Fourth Enlightenment Salon – Political Segment: Discussion on Artificial Intelligence in Politics, Voting Systems, and Democracy

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Gennady Stolyarov II
Bill Andrews
Bobby Ridge
John Murrieta


This is the third and final video segment from Mr. Stolyarov’s Fourth Enlightenment Salon.

Watch the first segment here.

Watch the second segment here.

On July 8, 2018, during his Fourth Enlightenment Salon, Gennady Stolyarov II, Chairman of the U.S. Transhumanist Party, invited John Murrieta, Bobby Ridge, and Dr. Bill Andrews for an extensive discussion about transhumanist advocacy, science, health, politics, and related subjects.

Topics discussed during this installment include the following:

• What is the desired role of artificial intelligence in politics?
• Are democracy and transhumanism compatible?
• What are the ways in which voting and political decision-making can be improved relative to today’s disastrous two-party system?
• What are the policy implications of the development of artificial intelligence and its impact on the economy?
• What are the areas of life that need to be separated and protected from politics altogether?

 

Join the U.S. Transhumanist Party for free, no matter where you reside by filling out an application form that takes less than a minute. Members will also receive a link to a free compilation of Tips for Advancing a Brighter Future, providing insights from the U.S. Transhumanist Party’s Advisors and Officers on some of what you can do as an individual do to improve the world and bring it closer to the kind of future we wish to see.

 

Proposal for Chimeric Gene Therapy (v1.3.1) – Curing Trauma, Addiction, and Conditioning – Paper by Kyrtin Atreides

Proposal for Chimeric Gene Therapy (v1.3.1) – Curing Trauma, Addiction, and Conditioning – Paper by Kyrtin Atreides

Kyrtin Atreides


Editor’s Note: The U.S. Transhumanist Party has published this research paper and proposal for a practical gene therapy by member Kyrtin Atreides in order to solicit input from other researchers in the field of gene therapy as well as to provide some ideas for further directions in research and practical applications of genetic engineering. The U.S. Transhumanist Party does not itself conduct research or recommend particular medical procedures, so the publication of this paper should be seen as promoting the exploration of research paths that could one day (hopefully sooner rather than later) materialize into viable treatments for curing diseases and lengthening lifespans. 

~ Gennady Stolyarov II, Chairman, United States Transhumanist Party, April 1, 2018

Introduction:

A wise medical director once told me that 50% of those who go into the field of Psychology need psychological help themselves. I suspect that one day I’ll be able to say the same of genetic engineering.

Epigenetics control our neurochemistry, which dictates base level reactions to stimuli, and everything from a bad meal, job, relationship, or traumatic childhood event, to warzone PTSD, can trigger epigenetic changes. [1] De Bellis, M. D., & A.B., A. Z. (2014), [2] Gudsnuk, K., & Champagne, F. A. (2012), [3] Hardy, T. M., & Tollefsbol, T. O. (2011)

Over time these changes build up, and since human society is often highly unstable due to rapid and lopsided progression, the net result is cumulative damage, similar to aging, because epigenetics attempt to attune you to an environment that doesn’t change in compatible ways. [4] Bowers, E. C., & McCullough, S. D. (2017)

What this means is that in order to roll back the clock the epigenetic equation needs to be recalculated in a local space, a process which occurs with a viral knockout, or insertion of new genetic data, within a region surrounding any given gene. The basic idea is that if you alter the dimensions of the space that the epigenetic equation covers via methylation, you cause it to recalculate the ideal distribution and genetic activation for that region based on current data, rather than the trauma which previously altered it.

By causing this update to take place, the gene expression is recalculated to values which are more closely aligned with current needs and environmental factors. Previously in human history, lives were shorter and epigenetic influences served a healthy role in promoting survival, but the problem with amassing a large pile of trauma-induced epigenetic changes becomes acutely apparent as age increases.  [5] Teschendorff, A. E., West, J., & Beck, S. (2013)

Each change is based on data fixed to the point of trauma, and any alteration to that expression is glacially slow, if it occurs at all. Often times such changes break an element of neurochemistry in the sense that the change can’t naturally reverse itself once it has been made, but it can be easily reversed with minor engineering.

Different genes act like functions in code, separate blocks which can function together, but which also contain sites where new code can be placed without causing harm to the current code. In the same way the human genome also contains 8% integrated viral DNA, which makes for an ideal target for gene knock-out.  [6] (International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium, 2001; Smit, 1999)

Proposal Part 1:

What I propose is two-fold. The first step is the creation of a gene therapy which is practically viable, costing no more than $5 per person in production. The second step is testing the top gene sites active in controlling neurochemistry with both knock-out of viral DNA, and knock-in of dormant placeholder DNA, to cause recalculation to take place.

The first is easily accomplished by understanding the nature of why anything evolves in the first place, for survival. If you create a gene therapy whose survival is guaranteed it loses reason to adapt maliciously, because there is no advantage to be gained. A classic case that demonstrates a virus becoming less lethal over time is HIV, where initially it was a death sentence, but over time not only were treatments developed, the virus became less lethal, because that lethality was acting as a detriment to the purpose of survival, and it evolved in order to live longer. [7] Payne, R., Muenchhoff, M., Mann, J., Roberts, H. E., Matthews, P., Adland, E., … Goulder, P. J. R. (2014)

The myriad of bacteria, archaea, viruses, and eukaryotic microbes in our bodies that outnumber our own cells have come to a balanced state, where our bodies are the ecosystem, and as that 8% viral DNA demonstrates a virus is no different, it favors survival and a stable environment. [8] Eloe-Fadrosh, E. A., & Rasko, D. A. (2013)

I mention this because of a key factor which makes gene therapy completely impractical today, 293T cells. Having to use specialty cells for cloning a virus that isn’t replication-competent, and is often very fragile to begin with, is one monumental waste, which is built on the unfounded fear that a replication-competent virus is in and of itself a threat. As machine learning is applied to the human genome, as well as non-human genomes, the error in that line of reasoning will become increasingly apparent.

What we need is a new gene therapy, engineered for high conversion rates, such as Adeno-Associated-Virus-7 or Lentivirus, and hybridized with a more durable, low-symptom (“clinically silent”), low-transmission-potential virus, such as Epstein-Barr Virus. By making such a virus replication-competent, but also self-inactivating (EBV) and able to integrate itself as a genetic landing site capable of being periodically updated, not only is the problem of practicality and cost solved, but the speed with which new research can be tested is greatly accelerated, and the virus is rendered stable. EBV in particular is already present in roughly 95% of adults, as it has integrated with their genomes. When combined with revised best practices any risk of bad-actor genetic engineering remains a practical impossibility.

By keeping the intermediate stages of the gene therapy in a controlled environment and only releasing the end result beyond that point, the Bio-Safety risk remains functionally unchanged, as the hypothetical “bad actor” would still require the same advanced tools, knowledge, and materials to generate a harmful virus as they already do today. The key difference in Bio-Safety terms is that by allowing the field to advance, the benefits and possible means of defense against that hypothetical would move forward, while undermining the root cause of said hypotheticals. This would be roughly equivalent to creating bulletproof sleepwear before the invention of the firearm.

The end result of utilizing such a gene therapy would be a symbiotic relationship with a genetic update mechanism, where increases to lifespan and survival rates favor both parties, resulting in potential rare mutations that better serve that purpose, like a bird evolving a better beak for catching fish.

Selection of EBV to hybridize with Lentivirus would also allow for the therapy to enter dormant cycles, avoiding immune-system rejection, and reactivating when introduced to engineered updates from additional gene therapy treatments. [9] Houldcroft, C. J., & Kellam, P. (2015)

The replication-competent gene therapy can be created with either AAV-7 or Lentivirus by means of recombination during the manufacturing process. An AAV-2 or AAV-7 variant may be preferable, if not required, for the treatment of HIV-positive humans due to the risk of interaction between any Lentivirus gene therapy and the HIV virus. It is however probable that a Lentivirus/EBV chimeric gene therapy would overwrite wild HIV virus variants rather than being overwritten by them, but rigorous testing is required, which development of this therapy would also make possible. This is partly due to the far greater size, complexity, and long-term stability of EBV compared to Lentivirus. [10] Haifeng Chen. (2015)

On a side note the genetics study that led me to realize this epigenetic mechanic was in play is shown here:

[11] Welle, S., Cardillo, A., Zanche, M., & Tawil, R. (2009)

It was by examining the difference between an adult with gene knock-out applied after maturation versus one born with the modification that the mechanic of Methylation Dimensions / Dimensions of DNA was illuminated. Since this process occurs naturally as a part of viral integration, a mechanic had to evolve that could handle the recalculation. The above study also highlights that gene therapies shouldn’t be administered to individuals prior to adulthood, due to the differences in how they impact an individual prior to biological maturation, unless the need is dire, or unless the difference can be corrected upon maturation.

Another failing point of gene therapies as they exist today is that, due to the lack of replication-competence, viral titers act as a choke-point, where the virus is injected in-mass rather than gradually converting cells, massively increasing the risk of cellular toxicity and immunotoxicity. If a gene therapy was replication-competent, even an extremely low dose could achieve a high level of cellular conversion over a period of time, potentially closing in on Bayes Error, regardless of host mass. In effect, the same dose that yields positive results in a mouse could also work for a human. [12] White, M., Whittaker, R., Gándara, C., & Stoll, E. A. (2017)

Proposal Part 2:

Once the new gene therapy is complete, the ability to repair damage at the epigenetic level becomes practical, speeding up the testing process by an order of magnitude, as well as greatly reducing cost.  For the purpose of initial testing and separation of documented effects, knock-out of viral DNA and placeholder-gene knock-in will be targeted to recalculate small regions surrounding key neurochemistry controlling genes, a few of which I’ve listed below:

HTR6 – Chromosome 1 – (5-Hydroxytryptamine Receptor 6) is a Protein Coding gene.  Diseases associated with HTR6 include Acute Stress Disorder and Amnestic Disorder.

NR4A2 – Chromosome 2 – (Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 4 Group A Member 2) is a Protein Coding gene. Diseases associated with NR4A2 include Arthritis and Late-Onset Parkinson Disease. Among its related pathways are Dopaminergic Neurogenesis and Corticotropin-releasing hormone signaling pathway. GO annotations related to this gene include transcription factor activity, sequence-specific DNA binding, and protein heterodimerization activity. An important paralog of this gene is NR4A3.

HES1 – Chromosome 3 – (Hes Family BHLH Transcription Factor 1) is a Protein Coding gene. Among its related pathways are Signaling by NOTCH1 and NOTCH2 Activation and Transmission of Signal to the Nucleus. GO annotations related to this gene include transcription factor activity, sequence-specific DNA binding, and sequence-specific DNA binding. An important paralog of this gene is HES4. [13] Epigen Global Research Consortium(2015)

DRD5 – Chromosome 4 – (Dopamine Receptor D5) is a Protein Coding gene.  This receptor is expressed in neurons in the limbic regions of the brain. It has a 10-fold higher affinity for dopamine than the D1 subtype.

SLC6A3 – Chromosome 5 – (Solute Carrier Family 6 Member 3) is a Protein Coding gene. Diseases associated with SLC6A3 include Parkinsonism-Dystonia, Infantile and Nicotine Dependence, Protection Against.

DRD1 – Chromosome 5 – (Dopamine Receptor D1) is a Protein Coding gene.  Diseases associated with DRD1 include Cerebral Meningioma and Drug Addiction.

TAAR1 – Chromosome 6 – (Trace Amine Associated Receptor 1) is a Protein Coding gene. Although some trace amines have clearly defined roles as neurotransmitters in invertebrates, the extent to which they function as true neurotransmitters in vertebrates has remained speculative. Trace amines are likely to be involved in a variety of physiological functions that have yet to be fully understood.

DDC – Chromosome 7 – (Dopa Decarboxylase) is a Protein Coding gene. Among its related pathways are Dopamine metabolism and Metabolism.

CRH – Chromosome 8 – CRH (Corticotropin Releasing Hormone, aka CRF) is a Protein Coding gene. Diseases associated with CRH include Crh-Related Related Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy, Autosomal Dominant and Autosomal Dominant Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy. Among its related pathways are G alpha (s) signalling events and Signaling by GPCR. GO annotations related to this gene include receptor binding and neuropeptide hormone activity. [14] Sandman CA, Curran MM, Davis EP, Glynn LM, Head K, Baram TZ.(2018)

HTR7 – Chromosome 10 – (5-Hydroxytryptamine Receptor 7) is a Protein Coding gene. Diseases associated with HTR7 include Autistic Disorder and Byssinosis.

ETS1 – Chromosome 11 – (ETS Proto-Oncogene 1, Transcription Factor) is a Protein Coding gene. Among its related pathways are Photodynamic therapy-induced NF-kB survival signaling and MAPK-Erk Pathway. GO annotations related to this gene include transcription factor activity, sequence-specific DNA binding and transcription factor binding. An important paralog of this gene is ETS2.

HTR2A – Chromosome 13 – (5-Hydroxytryptamine Receptor 2A) is a Protein Coding gene. Diseases associated with HTR2A include Schizophrenia and Major Depressive Disorder and Accelerated Response to Antidepressant Drug Treatment.

SLC6A4 – Chromosome 17 – (Solute Carrier Family 6 Member 4) is a Protein Coding gene. Diseases associated with SLC6A4 include Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Slc6a4-Related Altered Drug Metabolism.

TCF4 – Chromosome 18 – (Transcription Factor 4) is a Protein Coding gene. Among its related pathways are Mesodermal Commitment Pathway and Regulation of Wnt-mediated beta catenin signaling and target gene transcription. GO annotations related to this gene include transcription factor activity, sequence-specific DNA binding and protein heterodimerization activity. An important paralog of this gene is TCF12.

OXT – Chromosome 20 – (Oxytocin/Neurophysin I Prepropeptide) is a Protein Coding gene. This gene encodes a precursor protein that is processed to produce oxytocin and neurophysin I. Oxytocin is a posterior pituitary hormone which is synthesized as an inactive precursor in the hypothalamus along with its carrier protein neurophysin I. Together with neurophysin, it is packaged into neurosecretory vesicles and transported axonally to the nerve endings in the neurohypophysis, where it is either stored or secreted into the bloodstream. The precursor seems to be activated while it is being transported along the axon to the posterior pituitary. This hormone contracts smooth muscle during parturition and lactation. It is also involved in cognition, tolerance, adaptation, and complex sexual and maternal behavior, as well as in the regulation of water excretion and cardiovascular functions.

AVP – Chromosome 20 – (Arginine Vasopressin) is a Protein Coding gene. Diseases associated with AVP include Diabetes Insipidus, Neurohypophyseal and Hereditary Central Diabetes Insipidus. Among its related pathways are G alpha (s) signalling events and HIV Life Cycle. GO annotations related to this gene include protein kinase activity and signal transducer activity. An important paralog of this gene is OXT.

These genes represent only a fraction of the neurochemistry control sites, but they are disproportionately represented in terms of impact due to being frequently targeted by a wide variety of damaging sources focused on addiction, conditioning, reward-behaviors, and various forms of trauma.  By changing the dimensions of a region that methylation, phosphorylation, acetylation, and histone modification have to cover the recalculation is triggered and optimized to the current environment. [15] Tuesta, L. M., & Zhang, Y. (2014), [16] Samonte FGR.(2017)

It is also worth noting that in the case of more extreme imbalances two or more gene targets would either need to be iteratively, or simultaneously, recalculated in order to reach a balanced state. By using one gene therapy, then a second on the parallel site, such as the case with OXT vs. AVP balance, you could iteratively progress towards a balanced state with less extreme gene expression levels, like turning the sides of a Rubik’s Cube. Using multiple versions of the same gene therapy, attaching to different target sites, this process could be activated simultaneously, causing the recalculation to factor in all discovered and targeted regions at once, effectively “training” the epigenetic weights of highly connected regions, instead of working iteratively where half of them are frozen at any given time. Initially this simultaneous trigger could be via standard injection, but it could also be automated a variety of ways, including using links to circadian rhythm conditions and seasonal changes, causing routine recalculation of mental and emotional health critical gene expression. [17] Neumann, ID, Landgraf R.(2012)

Since none of the genes are directly impacted, only recalculating their level of activation, risk is kept to a bare minimum, and the same approach can be repeated to yield different results by varying the conditions present as the gene therapy takes effect.  Ideal circumstances for any given outcome can be established by varying environmental factors until the result is optimized, potentially even personalized, and though this approach would be ideally suited for a laboratory environment, it could also help to establish best-practices for administering the gene therapies once they reached human trials.

Results of epigenetic recalculation could be further utilized for mathematically modeling the potential space of gene activation when coupled with environmental data from the trial facility, increasing prediction accuracy for post-therapy gene expression, as well as the subsequent benefits.

The before-versus-after comparison between fully mapped genomes could also be used in Deep Neural Network terms to generate accurate predictions for post-therapy gene activation levels and the approximate benefits of those changes. A DNN could even be modeled to map causal relationships between epigenetic activation changes in a way that has likely never been done before, allowing for many genes with currently unknown functions to be defined, opening the door to more advanced models that could map the causal and probable space of genetic engineering with far greater accuracy.

In Closing:

How long we remain mired in the Medieval times of genetic engineering is purely up to us, as a collective we can form a safety committee which agrees to create a practical gene therapy that shifts the paradigm away from monopolistic control to one where science can advance, and people can benefit from advances without waiting 20 years for approval.

The best way to win the hearts and minds of people around the world is to give them something to be grateful for, benefiting either themselves or those they love in meaningful ways. I can think of no better start down this path than curing the epigenetic effects of trauma, as virtually everyone has suffered some form of trauma in their lives, and many are needlessly crippled by it today.

Without the scars left on humanity at the epigenetic level the negative-influence house of cards collapses, along with all of the industries who prey upon it, breaking the downward spiral and moving the dial forward, from pointing towards a deeper Dystopia to a brighter future.

Transhumanism is likewise about the freedom to choose who you are, and who you become, which in the field of genetic engineering means that a practical method for genetic updates is as much a prerequisite as the computer was a prerequisite for the Internet. It would by no means remove the threat of archaic legal constructs, but it would greatly reduce their potency, taking us one step closer to being truly Transhuman.

Taking this a step further, the ability to reset the epigenetic level influence of trauma, addiction, and conditioned behaviors is also prerequisite to any major social change, as backlash comes into play when friction of the old meets new paradigms. The act of curing the effects of trauma would in this way also serve to make people more open to new ideas, since the baseline of their neurochemistry shifting would trigger subsequent recalculation going up the chain, all the way to higher order cognitive functions. This could potentially be used to shift neurochemistry into unexplored probability space, allowing for configurations that couldn’t arise naturally.

Without the practical potential there is no room for innovation, and progress stagnates behind monumental pay-gates, but the solution can be engineered today, giving innovators access to build a better tomorrow.

Humanity is but one life form among billions of ever-evolving forms of life that we know of today, and even if only 1 in 10,000 of those lifeforms were evolving in ways compatible with our genetic structure we’d be wasting 99.9999% of the potential evolutionary improvements being made by other species.  Life in the known universe is in a perpetual race to evolve, and to compete in that race in any meaningful way, increasing the survival of the species, it is necessary to take advantage of the advances that other forms of life make, the other 99.9999%+ compute power dedicated to the task of evolving into ever more advanced and resilient beings.  While humanity may not be ready to take this step any time soon, perhaps once the world is cured of trauma this will enter the realm of consideration.

If humanity is to survive, let alone thrive, in the hazards of space, genetic engineering that grants us the resilience of life forms able to survive considerable exposure to radiation, extreme temperatures, increased gravity, and even the vacuum of space, are required for us to move forward. Even survival on Earth is a moving target, and as humanity stands today, vulnerability to any number of cataclysms remains much higher than it could be. Fans of longevity research should favor the generation of a practical gene therapy most of all, because it would only take a few direct gene edits using such a therapy to significantly increase life span, granting talented scientists more years with which they could work towards overcoming challenge after challenge.

Limiting gene therapy treatment to the rarest of diseases is like limiting internet access to the most remote parts of the world, an astronomical waste, and it is time for that to change. From the more directly Transhumanist perspective, this is a step towards being free to choose who you are right down to the genetic level, accessible to everyone, a basic human right that has yet to be written, but before reaching that point humanity needs an epigenetic tabula rasa, a slate clean of trauma, conditioning, and addiction.

Kyrtin Atreides is a researcher and member of the U.S. Transhumanist Party. In his spare time over the past two years, he has conducted research into Psychoacoustics, Quantum Physics, Genetics, Language (Advancement of), Deep Learning / Artificial General Intelligence (AGI), and a variety of other branching domains, and continues to push the limits of what can be created or discovered.

For additional reading on the subject matter mentioned herein, please refer to:

Lentivirus: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2837622/

https://viralzone.expasy.org/264?outline=all_by_species

Adeno-Associated Virus: https://www.wjgnet.com/2220-3184/full/v5/i3/28.htm

https://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php/Epstein-Barr_Virus

Formal Citations:

1. De Bellis, M. D., & A.B., A. Z. (2014). “The Biological Effects of Childhood Trauma.” Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America23(2), 185–222. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.chc.2014.01.002

2. Gudsnuk, K., & Champagne, F. A. (2012). Epigenetic Influence of Stress and the Social Environment. ILAR Journal53(3-4), 279–288. http://doi.org/10.1093/ilar.53.3-4.279

3. Hardy, T. M., & Tollefsbol, T. O. (2011). Epigenetic diet: impact on the epigenome and cancer. Epigenomics3(4), 503–518. http://doi.org/10.2217/epi.11.71

4. Bowers, E. C., & McCullough, S. D. (2017). Linking the Epigenome with Exposure Effects and Susceptibility: The Epigenetic Seed and Soil Model. Toxicological Sciences155(2), 302–314. http://doi.org/10.1093/toxsci/kfw215

5. Teschendorff, A. E., West, J., & Beck, S. (2013). Age-associated epigenetic drift: implications, and a case of epigenetic thrift? Human Molecular Genetics22(R1), R7–R15. http://doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddt375

6. Pakorn Aiewsakun, Aris Katzourakis(2015) Endogenous viruses: Connecting recent and ancient viral evolution. Virology. 2015 May;479-480:26-37. doi: 10.1016/j.virol.2015.02.011. Epub 2015 Mar 12.

7. Payne, R., Muenchhoff, M., Mann, J., Roberts, H. E., Matthews, P., Adland, E., … Goulder, P. J. R. (2014). Impact of HLA-driven HIV adaptation on virulence in populations of high HIV seroprevalence. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America111(50), E5393–E5400. http://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1413339111

8. Eloe-Fadrosh, E. A., & Rasko, D. A. (2013). The Human Microbiome: From Symbiosis to Pathogenesis. Annual Review of Medicine64, 145–163. http://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-med-010312-133513

9. Houldcroft, C. J., & Kellam, P. (2015). Host genetics of Epstein–Barr virus infection, latency and disease. Reviews in Medical Virology25(2), 71–84. http://doi.org/10.1002/rmv.1816

10. Haifeng Chen. (2015) Adeno-associated virus vectors for human gene therapy. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. doi: 10.5496/wjmg.v5.i3.28

11. Welle, S., Cardillo, A., Zanche, M., & Tawil, R. (2009). Skeletal muscle gene expression after myostatin knockout in mature mice Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: S. Welle, Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Ave., Box 693, Rochester, NY 14642 (e-mail: stephen_welle@urmc.rochester.edu). Physiological Genomics38(3), 342–350. http://doi.org/10.1152/physiolgenomics.00054.2009

12. White, M., Whittaker, R., Gándara, C., & Stoll, E. A. (2017). A Guide to Approaching Regulatory Considerations for Lentiviral-Mediated Gene Therapies. Human Gene Therapy Methods28(4), 163–176. http://doi.org/10.1089/hgtb.2017.096

13. Lillycrop KA1, Costello PM2, Teh AL3, Murray RJ2, Clarke-Harris R2, Barton SJ4, Garratt ES2, Ngo S5, Sheppard AM5, Wong J3, Dogra S3, Burdge GC2, Cooper C6, Inskip HM4, Gale CR7, Gluckman PD8, Harvey NC4, Chong YS9, Yap F10, Meaney MJ11, Rifkin-Graboi A3, Holbrook JD3; Epigen Global Research Consortium, Godfrey KM12. Int J Epidemiol. 2015 Aug;44(4):1263-76. doi: 10.1093/ije/dyv052.

14. Sandman CA, Curran MM, Davis EP, Glynn LM, Head K, Baram TZ.(2018) Am J Psychiatry. 2018 Mar 2:appiajp201716121433. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.16121433.

15. Tuesta, L. M., & Zhang, Y. (2014). Mechanisms of epigenetic memory and addiction. The EMBO Journal33(10), 1091–1103. http://doi.org/10.1002/embj.201488106

16. Samonte FGR.(2017) The Epigenetic of Dopamine Reward in Obesity and Drug Addiction: A Philippine Perspective. J Clin Epigenet. 2017, 3:2. doi: 10.21767/2472-1158.100051

17. Neumann, ID, Landgraf R.(2012) Balance of brain oxytocin and vasopressin: implications for anxiety, depression, and social behaviors. Trends Neurosci. 2012 Nov;35(11):649-59. doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2012.08.004. Epub 2012 Sep 11.

U.S. Transhumanist Party Interview with Bobby Ridge

U.S. Transhumanist Party Interview with Bobby Ridge

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Gennady Stolyarov II and Bobby Ridge


Gennady Stolyarov II, Chairman of the United States Transhumanist Party, interviews Bobby Ridge, a researcher into transhumanist philosophy and the scientific method and the new Secretary-Treasurer of the United States and Nevada Transhumanist Parties.

Watch this conversation regarding the subjects of Mr. Ridge’s research, the scientific method, and transhumanism more generally.

Bobby Ridge has a Bachelor’s Degree in Biomedical Science from California State University of Sacramento (CSUS) and is striving to achieve his MD in Neurology. He only recently became a Transhumanist. He conducts research for CSUS’s Psychology Department and his own personal research on the epistemology and Scientiometrics of the Scientific Method. He also co-owns Togo’s in Citrus Heights, CA. Mr. Ridge considers transhumanism to describe the future of humanity taking its next steps in evolution, which are both puissant and daunting. With the exponential increase in information technology, Mr. Ridge considers it important for us to become a science-based species to prevent a dystopian-type future from occurring.

Become a member of the U.S. Transhumanist Party for free by filling out this form.